Bewitching Sights Between Pineapples, Dolphins and Petroglyphs

Petroglyphs, Kukui Point
Petroglyphs, Kukui Point
© HVCB / Ron Dahlquist

Luahiwa Petroglyphs

The petroglyphs are inscribed on boulders on a steep slope overlooking the Palawai Basin and these rock drawings are a mixture of ancient and historic styles. The petroglyphs are considered to be very fragile so be sure not handle or disrupt them in any way.

Villas at Koele

The Villas at Koele reflect the architectural theme of the world-acclaimed Lodge at Koele. Limited to 88 residences, these townhomes border Koele Golf Course.

The Lodge at Koele

Located in Koele, on the northeast corner of Lanai City was the historic centre of ranching operations, Lanai Ranch Company (1911-1951). Presently, it is the site of the Lodge at Koele, a luxurious 102-room resort hotel.

Lanai City

The only town in Lanai sits at an elevation of approximately 1,700 feet above sea level. The city was built to be the focal point of the pineapple industry in 1924. The total population of Lanai currently numbers around 3,200 people and all but a handful of the residents live in Lanai City.

Biker on Munro Trail, Koele
Biker on Munro Trail, Koele
© HVCB / Ron Dahlquist

Munro Trail

This is a ridge trail named after George Munro, ranch manager of the Lanai Ranch Company, who in 1911-1935 began a reforestation programme for Lanai. Taking you over Lanaihale, options are by four-wheel drive or hiking only. Note that on wet days, portions of the trail may be impassable and extreme caution should be used.

Keomuku Village

Keomoku Village is marked by the presence of an old church along the northeast coast of Lanai. The Maunalei Sugar Company, in 1898, began an extensive effort to raise sugar along the coast but unfortunately the company failed. In the early 20th century, the Gay family utilised Keomoku as the coastal headquarters for their cattle and sheep ranch. By 1951 all ranch operations had ceased and the remaining Keomoku population moved up to Lanai City.

Kahalepalaoa

Kahalepalaoa is located in east Lanai. The site of the old wharf used for the shipping of sugar cane to Maui, the name translates to "storehouse for ivory," probably due to the fact that whale bones were once quite prevalent on the eastern shores. This is also the site of an ancient heiau and Buddhist shrine so visitors are asked to be respectful and not remove items or disrupt the site in any way.

Naha

Naha is located along the southeast side of Lanai and is the site of an ancient fishpond that can be seen clearly at low tide. The sandy shorelines end here as the pali, or cliffs, begin their rise along the south, west and north shares to Polihua. Frequented by local fishermen, Naha is not for swimming and caution should be exercised during times of high surf when the shorebreak and current can become dangerous.

Puu Pehe from Shark's Cove
Puu Pehe from Shark's Cove
© HVCB / Ron Dahlquist

Puupehe Islet

The islet is named after the beautiful Puupehe, who was buried at the top of the pinnacle. Her lover, Makakehau, retrieved her body from the sea cave at the base of the cliff that was filled by the surge of storm swells and carried her body to the top of the inaccessible summit with the help of spiritual ancestors where he buried her. A love story that exalts the memory of Puupehe and the sad ending of Makakehau who leapt to his death.

Dolphins off Lanai
Dolphins off Lanai
© HVCB / Ron Dahlquist

Hulapoeo Bay-Tide Pools

Located in south Lanai is Hulapoeo Bay, a favourite fishing and swimming beach, Hulapoeo and Manele were once ancient Hawaiian villages dating back to 900 AD. Hulapoeo Bay is part of a Marine Life Conservation District and a preferred habitat for Hawaiian spinner dolphins making the tide pools around here a wonderful place to discover fascinating inhabitants of these "natural aquariums".

NOTE:

Dolphins, like all marine mammals in US waters, are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Any action undertaken deliberately that disrupts their behaviour is subject to fines, confiscation of property and possible imprisonment.

The best time to explore is when the tide is low and going out. Carry a tide pool guide booklet with you and exercise caution, as some marine life may be hazardous to touch. Hulapoeo Bay is an excellent beach for water activities, including swimming, boogie-boarding and snorkelling. During times of large swells and high surf, extreme caution should be exercised.

Manele Bay Estates - The Terraces, Manele Bay

Located along the southern shore of Lanai are the elegant and stunning new custom homes and townhouses known as the Manele Bay Estates and the Terraces, Manele Bay. Designed to reflect the Mediterranean and Hawaiian theme of the nearby Manele Bay Hotel, the Terraces offer an enclave of private two and three bedroom townhomes. In addition, the Manele Bay Estates offer limited one-half acre and one-acre ocean view sites, many of which are adjacent to the Jack Nicklaus-designed Challenge at Manele golf course.

Sailing Boats at Manele Bay
Sailing Boats at Manele Bay
© HVCB / Ron Dahlquist

Manele Bay

Manele Bay, like Hulapoeo Bay, is a Marine Life Conservation District and was once part of an ancient Hawaiian village. Manele is also the site of the only public boat harbour on the island and was the location of most post-contact shipping until Kaumalapau Harbor was built in 1926. Swimming is dangerous and not recommended due to boat traffic.

Fisherman Costal Trail — Kaunolu

Kaunolu is an ahupuaa (district) and bay located in southwest Lanai. This particular area is the location of a deserted pre-contact Hawaiian village, which was once a vigorous fishing community. Kaunolu is also the site of a puuhonua, or place of refuge. At times access may be denied due to archaeological work. Do not remove any items or disrupt this site in any way.

Kaumalapau Harbor

The Kaumalapau Harbour is located in west Lanai and was the principal seaport for Lanai. As the harbour is used for shipping, no water activities are allowed here.

Nanahoa

This islet off west Lanai is said to have once been a man named Nanahoa and his wife who were both turned into pillar stones.