There is a Paradise, and Hawaii is its Garden

Plumeria
Plumeria
© HCVB
As the islands were never part of a larger landmass, none of the plants or animals that exist in Hawaii originated there.

All the islands of Hawaii were formed from volcanoes. Soon after the lava cooled, tides, winds, and birds carried seeds to the islands which grew into dense forests and shrubs. Later, Polynesian settlers arrived in canoes, bringing plants and animals from their native lands.

Much of the flora and fauna developed special adaptations to their new home and evolved into new species. Today nearly 90% of the plants and animals on Hawaii are endemic, meaning that they exist nowhere else in the world.

Nanaue Waterfall
Nanaue Waterfall
© HVCB / Kirk Aeder
Since Hawaii's native plants and animals evolved in the absence of predators or competitors, they did not develop natural defenses such as thorns, poisons, or camouflage. Many native species have therefore been pushed to the brink of extinction by alien plants or animals that were later introduced to Hawaii and the Hawaiian Islands are home to over 50% of all plants on the US endangered species list. In spite of all this, however, Hawaii still boasts an astounding degree of biodiversity and 21 of the world's 22 climatic zones are represented here, from tropical rainforests to snow-capped summits.

Sugarcane, pineapples, guavas, mangoes, papayas, coconuts, avocados, bananas, limes, passion fruit, macadamia nuts, breadfruit, and ginger are all cultivated on Hawaii.
The sandalwood tree (famous for its aromatic oil) also grows on the islands.